Immigration Law

Assistance with visa and green card applications and appeals, deportation defense, and citizenship and naturalization.

Immigration law is federal law primarily contained within Title 8 of the U.S. Code.

The Immigration and Nationality Act governs immigration into the United States. Additionally, Title 8 of the Code of Federal Regulations (8 CFR) contains immigration-related regulations, and the federal register publishes notices as well as proposed and final rules.

Finally, immigration case law that grows out of the United States’ body of administrative immigration courts and federal courts of appeals influences the content and interpretation of those laws.

Several federal agencies under the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) are responsible for the implementation and enforcement of immigration policy.

Within the United States, the administration of immigration laws is conducted by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

The enforcement of U.S. immigration law is primarily the responsibility of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), as well as Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

As previously noted, immigration courts are administrative bodies that help enforce immigration laws through the U.S. justice system, through the Department of Justice (DOJ).

Our Services

Our attorneys are skilled immigration advocates who are not only immigration law experts, but they also understand the immigration system itself because they have dealt with it first-hand.

The Rahgozar Law Firm prides itself on offering practical solutions for of its immigrant and employer-sponsorship clients. While strictly a matter of opinion, many consider us to be the best immigration firm in Houston, Texas.

We provide principled and passionate representation in the following areas:

First steps

Depending on which service you require, your needs will be different.

You can find more information about the services we offer on our website’s specific pages.  

Immigration law can be incredibly complicated, so you will want to hire an attorney to help you navigate the system. Our experienced attorneys are ready and able to help provide globe-status service in the Houston, Texas, area and around the world.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Can I apply for a visa in a Country where I do not reside?

You must apply for a visa at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate in your home, unless your country does not have a local U.S. Consulate; in which case, certain designated consulates oversee those foreign nationals. If you reside in a different country, other than your country of origin, then you can apply for a visa where you reside.  

What are the grounds for deportation?

The grounds of deportation include 5 categories: Persons with a broad range of criminal convictions; Persons who are members of certain prohibited organizations; Entering the country without proper authority or property status; Status violators, who violate the terms of their admission or work without permission; and, Certain people who become public charges within five years of entering the U.S.

Am I required to take a medical examination if I want an immigrant visa?

Yes, you must take a medical examination before an immigrant visa will be issued to you. 

What type of petition must my employer file for me to receive an employment-based visa?

Employment-based green card sponsorship categories are very complex, and some categories require Labor Certification through the Department of Labor (DOL) before the immigration application is filed with USCIS.

If a particular employment-based category does not require a Labor Certification, then your employer must file an Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker, Form I-140, for the appropriate preference category with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

For temporary employment visas, a separate application process is filed by your employer. But it is best to speak with an experienced immigration attorney about your case and qualifications. 

Can I use retained earnings as an investment to apply for the EB-5 Investor Visas?

No. Retained earnings are not considered an investment.

Schedule your Consultation

Fill out this form or call us at (832) 792-3636 Houston OR (210) 400-6111 San Antonio OR +98 (21) 6529-3006 Tehran

Our legal specialists will return your email or call within 24 business hours.